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SOME THINGS ARE BETTER LEFT UNFINISHED

September 28, 2017

heavyweight 14oz Cone Mills Selvedge Denim

14oz Heavyweight Selvedge Denim Cone Mills

 

14oz Selvedge Denim Heavyweight  Cone Mills

Available in the Regular Taper, Slim Taper, The Steadfast Jacket & The Ironside Jacket





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MEN'S JOURNAL - Preaching the Good News...

October 07, 2017

BORN IN THE USA

Thanks to the folks over at Men's Journal for bringing the good news to the uninitiated that investing in a top quality, American Made, raw selvedge denim jacket doesn't have to cost a small fortune. 

Brave Star Selvage The Ironside 14oz Selvadge Denim Jacket
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Brave Star Selvage

The Ironside 14oz Selvedge Denim Jacket

Fourteen ounces is a heavier weight for denim lovers who truly enjoy a lengthy break-in period. But that extra heft is worth the work out and the less polished look of the the non-gassed fabric will only get better with age. The jacket was designed with a straight fit and sleeves that move better than most, so you won’t feel tied down while you’re breaking it in.

[$120; bravestarselvage.com]

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BRAVE STAR SELVAGE GOING ULTRA HEAVYWEIGHT

January 21, 2017

BRAVE STAR SELVAGE GOING ULTRA HEAVYWEIGHT

Thanks to The Denim Hound for the review on the 21.5oz ultra heavyweight. Greg has a keen eye for all things indigo and has probably reviewed more selvedge denim than anyone else on this planet. Check it out here www.thedenimhound.com and give him a follow on his social channels.

21.5oz Ultra Heavyweight selvedge denim made in the USA

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BRAVE STAR SELVAGE – THE FIRST AMERICAN MADE, ALL SELVEDGE DENIM BRAND?
BRAVE STAR SELVAGE – THE FIRST AMERICAN MADE, ALL SELVEDGE DENIM BRAND?

August 14, 2016

I came across Brave Star Selvage online about 4 or 5 months ago. It seemed pretty good, but to be honest I was thrown off by the $79 price tag. I’m by no means a denim snob, but I just couldn’t see a pair of $79 dollar jeans competing with the quality I was used to. It didn’t seem logical. I know how much work goes into making a pair of jeans, where were they cutting the costs? The sewing? Were they getting cheap fabrics? But they used denim from Cone Mills and Japaneses denim from Kuroki, I just couldn’t figure it out. So foolishly, I left it alone all together. read on here...

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